Coney Island California

Painted Toms | How to Paint Your Toms
82 comments

Painted Toms | How to paint your own Toms | Painted Vans

With my Etsy shop I often run searches for “hand-painted” just to see what else is out there and what the market is like.  More frequently I have been coming across hand-painted stilettos and painted Tom’s that are way  over-priced.  To be honest, the shoes themselves are already expensive.  Now you can easily paint your own Toms without breaking the bank!

Supplies:

  • Any acrylic paint (expensive or not)… I’ve used Delta, Ceramcoat, Crafter’s Edition – The acrylic doesn’t matter as much as the sealer.
  • Brushes… soft bristles – the largest I use when painting shoes is a size 2… it does get a little tedious.
  • A high quality sealer – these usually run around $10-$15… I opt for the matte finish. If you prefer gloss or high gloss, get whichever suits your style.  You can purchase these at JoAnn’s, Dick Blicks, or any other art supply store and they are usually right next to the acrylic paint.  Just ask a clerk for help if you can’t find it.
  • A pair of Toms, Bobs, Vans – or any canvas shoe.

Process:

I always draw my design on the shoe with pencil first.  It doesn’t matter if you smear the lead as you will need to paint at least three coats of the acrylic over it anyhow for the design to really last (these are going on your feet remember!)  After you have your design drawn on, start painting.  Let each coat dry entirely before applying the next. On a hot day the paint dries quickly so each coat of paint can be applied much faster than on colder days.  I usually apply two coats of sealer regardless of what the directions on the bottle say.  That’s just a personal preference.  With my experience of painting on canvas and duck cloth I’ve never had a design wear off or get sun faded.  Most sealers say at least three coats, but that seems like overkill, especially with three coats of acrylic under it.  It doesn’t matter if you go a little outside of your acrylic painted area with the sealer and spill over onto the canvas.  Most sealers dry clear so don’t get too panicky if you see a darker spot of the canvas.  Wait a couple hours and it should dry up clear.

As a side note, do not get overly stressed out and do not freak out if you make any mistakes.  I know you spent a pretty penny on the shoes, but the beauty of acrylic is it dries fast and can ALWAYS be painted over (one of the many reason I started working with it and never left its side).  Take a couple deep breaths. Remember anything you do can be undone and fixed, and keep painting.  If I make a hideous mistake I usually design something larger, paint white over the old design, and draw the new, larger design onto the shoe.  Then start from scratch.

And there you have it… your own pair of painted Toms!

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82 Comments

  1. Rheda Lewis |

    my question to you is…….do you have to seal the canvas shoe before you paint it……will it fade thru to you feet? thank you, rhe’

    Reply
    • admin |

      Hey Rhe!

      No you don’t have to seal anything until the very end. And acrylic paint will not fade or rub off through the shoe, onto your feet, so you don’t have to worry about that! It is entirely permanent. :) The only way the paint could possibly come off is if you very roughly (and repeatedly) scratch the outer surface over an extended period of time, and that is why I recommend painting several coats of the design with the acrylic paint before sealing it (especially if the shoes are for younger kids who are especially rough with their shoes).

      <3 Brooke

      Reply
  2. Julia |

    What kind of sealer have you found to work best? I’ve used cheap-o sealer on other craft projects only to have it smear the paint… I would hate for this to happen on my beloved Toms!

    Reply
    • admin |

      I prefer Liquitex sealers, which are officially called Liquitex Acrylic Polymer Varnishes. A bottle can be order online from Dick Blick’s art supply for around $7 in the matte finish, and a $7 supply usually gets me through a few pairs of shoes. But if you want a glossy look they have several sheens available. I usually let the acrylic itself dry overnight before sealing them cause some colors do tend to run, especially if I’ve painted with white… But usually I don’t run into that problem with this sealer. I love Liquitex brand acrylics. A bit expensive if you’re stocking an entire craft room, but the colors are vivid and the quality is worth it.

      Reply
      • Beth |

        Is the sealer you mentioned a spray?

        I actually purchased a sealer prior to reading your post on the specific type of sealer. I purchased Aleene’s Spray Acrylic Sealer Matte Finish. But, after getting home, I was a little nervous if this would work on the canvas.

        I would appreciate any guidance on this.

        Thank you so much for your tips!!

        Reply
        • admin |

          The Liquitex sealer I mentioned is a paint-on sealer. It looks like a bottle of white acrylic paint and goes on sort of milky, but dries clear.

          I have yet to experiment with spray on sealers. I have always used the paint-on kind on my canvas paintings. In an at class a while back, I was told to seal with a paint-on sealer because they tend to preserve color better and spray sealers just weren’t used on canvas paintings much… So when I started painting Toms, I just stuck with what I would use on any canvas painting; it’s just preference really.

          I do know that most Etsy sellers state their Toms are sealed with a spray sealer.

          However, I also like the control of using a paint-on sealer because I can easily paint it only on desired areas, rather than having to spray the entire shoe with sealer, as all do not dry entirely clear. You can usually still see a subtle line where the sealer ends… sealing unpainted canvas tends to make the canvas slightly darker in color.

          I hope that helps! I wish I had more experience with spray on sealers and could offer more advise in that regard.

          - Brooke

          Reply
  3. Hannah |

    First of all thank you for this article! I am now going to the store to get some supplies to paint my toms! lol. I have one quick question though. I saw some handpainted toms on the web earlier that had some glitter on them. How do you add that to your toms? Is it easy?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I have yet to try adding glitter BUT… the glitter/Modge Podge glue-paint that I used for the Glitter Cell Phone Case tutorial is UHH-MAZING. It doesn’t flake off, has a built in clear coat, and keep the glitter’s sparkle without dulling it. If I were to try it (and now that you mention it, I just might!) I would mix 2/3 glitter with 1/3 modge podge and paint away! Since the area you’re painting is probably relatively small, you won’t need that much glitter and Modge Podge, and 1-3 coats ought to cover thoroughly.

      You can opt to seal the glitter glue-paint with the same sealer you use on your acrylic painted portion of the shoe, or simply leave it unsealed. The Modge Podge dries with a clear coat sort of built in, so it will have the same water-proofing effect as the sealer… and since you’re not worried about preserving the color of the paint (since it’s glitter) the sealer is sort of unecessary.

      Glitter Toms…. such a good idea!!! I’ll have to try it and update the tutorial!

      Reply
  4. alexis |

    is there a diffference between the Liquitex Matte Acrylic Varnish and Liquitex Acrylic Polymer Varnishes that you mentioned?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      The acrylic polymer varnish comes in several finishes, including a matte finish. It’s possible they are one and the same, but the bottle i always order says acrylic polymer varnish.

      Reply
  5. Erica |

    Hello!,

    You have a very nice & informational blog! I would like to know if this acrylic paint & sealer are expensive or not, (I live in CA if that makes any difference). Also, i have grey toms that faded after i washed them, but on one of them, the tip is specifically more faded because hair dye accidentally landed on it -___- anywho, what do you reccommend i do with them?? is it possible to just repaint them the way they were w/acrylic paint, or will it look odd & it would be better to just add designs? p.s. are there any stencils for drawing/painting into toms? (i SUCK at creativity lol) Thank You!!! :D

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      The acrylic paint sealer that I prefer (Liquitex Acrylic Polymer Varnishes) are a little under $7 if you order them online. I don’t know if they’re available at all major craft stores, but I usually get mine from Dick Blicks. I also live in CA and most of their stores are in bigger cities, but they’ll ship anywhere.

      I think for your Toms it would probably be best to paint a design over the area that is more faded. Since they are canvas, you could dye them with Rit dye or any similar type of dye, but I don’t have any experience using it on Toms (I’ve only dyed t-shirts, sweatshirts, etc.) Also, if you were to dye them, the white base of the shoe might end up dyed as well, so take that into account.

      If you wanted to do a stenciled design, I would recommend using an adhesive stencil, and sponging paint on the design rather than brushing paint on. Adhesive stencils can be purchased at most craft stores (Michaels, etc.), but there are some really inexpensive and cute designs online. These are easy for people who have a tough time deciding what to paint or have a tough time painting. You just stick the stencil onto the shoe, sponge paint over, and peel the stencil off.

      Alternatively, Lil’ Blue Boo offers this tutorial where she used lace and spray paint to makeover her Toms. She doesn’t mention sealing them, and I would still suggest adding the sealer after the spray paint has dried. It will help the paint adhere longer and help the shoes stay cleaner, longer. Also, I believe she has a tutorial on covering Toms in glitter too! I haven’t tried this, and I would think it might crack or peel off after a while, but both are great ideas for a quick fix.

      Reply
    • Gabriella |

      I have seen several picyires of toms online where this happened to their shoes where it ripped or gaded at the toes. What they did was glue buttons on the bottom of it. As to what glue to use I would reseaech a little on that as I habe never done it before. I have also seen on pinterest people cutting their toms in a certain fashion to make sandals

      Reply
  6. Erica |

    Thanks Brooke! so what do you think i should use: acrylic, spray paint, or fabric paint to paint my toms with the stencils??

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I would use acrylic paint just because I’m most familiar with it and I know it lasts :)

      Reply
        • Brooke |

          If the design is large, try one, thin, even coat and the sealer week help it stay flexible. If the paint starts to wear thin, you can always touch up later :)

          Reply
          • Brooke |

            Acrylic will only crack if you paint on thick coats and use a cheap craft brand. If you use a high quality painters acrylic and paint thin coats it should not crack.

  7. Emily |

    Thanks so much!! This gave me the exact info I was looking for!! Thanks for taking the time to share!!

    Reply
  8. Jess |

    If you are painting white or other light colored acrylics on top of dark blue or black TOMS do you need to apply gesso to the shoe first to get the colors to show up? I’m nervous about cracking if I have to paint too many layers, but I read that gesso can cause cracking too.

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I have never apply gesso before painting on any color shoe… And I’ve never had my paint crack *crosses fingers*. The key is painting light coats and waiting until they fully dry. It usually takes three coats of white to fully cover on black… I’m unsure about navy as i have yet to paint navy shoes. If you’re really afraid about cracking, try Liquitex acrylics. They work for me :) but I’ve never heard of using gesso… And gesso makes canvas chalky and rigid so i would think it would make your design more prone to cracking, but I’ve never tried it… So I’m not sure. But i wouldn’t recommend it. Hope this helps! :)

      Reply
    • Brooke |

      I’ve been told that washing Toms causes the adhesive on the soles to break down, resulting in the foamy part ripping away from the canvas, so I’ve never tried washing the shoes. I do however use this same technique on canvas bags and wash those all the time in cold water and let them air dry. So i think it’s just a matter of whether our not you want to risk the whole adhesive ordeal. Usually i clean mine up with a tide to go pen on the canvas portion and a magic eraser on the sole.

      Hope this helps! :)

      Reply
    • Brooke |

      I know tide to go cleans dirt off the sole, but idk about paint. I usually mask that part off with painters tape before painting. Idk if you would want to risk taking a razor to the sole and scraping the paint away… :/ idk though. That seems risky.

      Reply
      • Marcia |

        I use a q-tip and a little bit of acetone or nail polish remover if I happen to get paint on the soles.

        Reply
  9. Jennifer |

    I have read conflicting things on which TOMS to purchase in order to paint them. Some places say WHITE TOMS, others say the NATURAL TOMS. Does it matter?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      It doesn’t matter… I personally LOVE how the natural look, especially when painted with a really colorful design. I also like the look of the grey when painted. Both the grey and natural tend to be easier to keep clean as well. :)

      Reply
  10. Pam |

    Thanks so much for the info. Could you tell me exactly what the name of the sealer is? I bought a liquidtex varnish product that was with the acrylic craft paints and you have to mix it and it is realllly glossy and when I washed the shoes it broke down and part of it came off. :(

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      Oh no! :( http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002YKKXE2/ref=redir_mdp_mobile this is the exact one I use. I only use Liquitex brand acrylics as well so I am not sure if there is some sort if bonding agent that their varnish has with their products. I also buy this polymer varnish in “matte”and it is slightly glossy (I’ve noticed most sealers are even if they say they aren’t) but the matte is more of a hazy gloss, so it isn’t a high sheen. It’s very subtle.

      Reply
  11. Kori |

    Have you ever used paint pens on TOMS? I am wanting to do smaller designs and think it will be easier with paint pens. Also, I want a maroon background. Should I buy maroon TOMS or buy natural TOMS and paint with maroon acrylic paint?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I have not yet used paint pens on TOMS but definitely want to try it out. I’ve seen a few people wearing designs drawn on with regular Sharpies and the edges don’t look as clean as I’d prefer, but I recently tried Sharpie’s Paint Markers and LOVE them. They’re oil-based (super hardy), totally permanent and come in various tip-widths, including fine-point, regular, and wide. I’ve painted a few coffee mugs with them and done the Sharpie bake thing to make it permanent and the markers last way longer than regular Sharpies. I’d definitely give ‘em a go. Practice on a separate paper or scrap fabric first though. With any paint marker you have to press the tip in to get paint to flow and pressing in for too long could result in a big blob. I’d also definitely still seal them after you’re done too.

      I would buy maroon TOMS. Painting the entire shoe maroon might make it a little stiff, which could be uncomfortable, at least until you broke em in a bit. Starting out with maroon TOMS would just be easier in my opinion.

      Reply
  12. Sarah |

    Hello! Thank you SOOOO much for your tips on how to paint TOMS. I was wondering what brand of acrylics you use, and also how to prevent cracking. Many thanks in advance!!

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      Hi Sarah! I’m so glad this tutorial is helping so many readers! I prefer Liquitex Basics acrylics in the matte finish (it also comes in a gloss finish). Their colors really pop. I have a set of primaries (standard red, blue, and yellow), black, white, and brown. I’ve managed to collect a few other colors like the magenta and yellow green, but for the most part, I’ll mix my own color from the primary colors when I can. Liquitex basics are a very opaque paint, so it doesn’t take a lot to get solid, even coloring. They tend to be a little more expensive, but a little color will go a long way, so I feel that in the end, it’s probably similarly priced as lesser-quality acrylic paint that takes a lot of coats to fully cover. Because the color quality is so good, I’ve managed to rarely need to apply more than two coats (sometimes I can even get away with one – eeks!) but this helps prevent cracking; the thicker and more brittle that paint is, the more easily it’s going to crack. I have one pair that is a little over a year old and I wear it least one a week; it has just barely started to crack along the seam where my toes bend. This pair is actually the pair pictured in the post (the sacred and immaculate heart pair) and the lettering is what has started coming off. I just re-painted it and re-sealed it. With how often I wear this pair, a year is a pretty good amount of time to last… but I’m beginning to think cracking is inevitable :(

      To make this pair last as long as I did, I just did everything in the tutorial. One to three coats of paint (the white banners took 3 coats) and two coats of sealer. I hope this helps!

      Reply
  13. Lexi |

    Does the sealant you’re usin protect from rain and water? I’m afraid the paint will run and I’m makin shoes for our school football games. Sometimes it rains so they need to be weather resistant. Any advice is appreciated. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      It does protect from rain. I’ve gotten mine wet walking to campus a few times and they hold up just fine :)

      Reply
      • Lexi |

        Ok I bought the Ceramacoat Varnish and I had a pair of $5 cheap shoes that I did a practice design on. I noticed that the red paint smeared into the white areas of the shoe and looked pink, and the paint had been dried several days. I very disappointed but the Hobby Lobby I went to did not have the Liquitex brand so I guess I am going to have to order it cause I do not want to have Toms getting ruined. Thank you for your informational blog!!!

        Reply
        • Brooke |

          Aww bummer :( if you try making the white part of the design the last part you paint, so it’s “on top” of or above the red coat… Or seal just the red portion (without touching the white) to hold the color in, then seal the entire design… Either if these tricks might work to prevent the bleeding.

          Reply
  14. Stephanie |

    I want to paint a glittery white pair of Toms. Is the process the same since it isn’t painting directly on canvas, but on the sparkles?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      The process would be the same, it just might take an extra coat to fully cover the sparkles. I haven’t tried painting a glitter pair yet, but I would imagine the paint would still stick. If the shoes are too smooth, like the satin ones, it takes a TON of coats to get the paint to cover, which ends up causing it to crack. I think the glitter Toms are still rough textured enough to where it shouldn’t be a problem. If you’re super worried, I think Kohl’s or Payless has imposter glitter Toms that you could test paint… and they even have kids sizes (which are even less expensive than the adult sizes).

      Reply
  15. Jennifer |

    Hi Brooke. Understand from your previous comment, after paint on the shoes need to use Liquitex Acrylic Polymer Varnishes to seal it. What about Modge Podge glue? Do you think it work the same? I used to paint my heels + glitter + Modge Podge glue. It is waterproof and the glitter stay on very well. So I just wonder i can use Podge glue instant of Liquitex.

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      Liquitex is just my preferred sealer. Tons of people prefer other brands or spray-on options… though I’ve never even thought about Modge Podge! I know Modge Podge states that it can be used as a sealer when applied in SUPER thin coats, so I think yeah that would probably work just fine. Personally, I would use a sponge brush to apply it though to prevent any brush strokes. Usually sealers that are specifically meant for acrylic paints are sort-of thin and self-level; I’m not sure Modge Podge would be as forgiving.

      Reply
    • Brooke |

      I use very tiny brushes… The largest size i use when painting shoes is a size 4, but even then i only use a brush that big for background detail. I use a 2/0 for most everything else.

      I’ve collected so many brushes over the years, but i have a full set of American Painter brushes, and the tiny brushes i use are Master’s Touch. The tiny brushes i replace a lot because the bristles get frayed after so much use, do i don’t worry about buying super good quality. They’re middle-of-the-road as far as quality goes.

      Reply
  16. Riley |

    i have a bunch of plain toms that i got for free and i want to make one of them glitter toms, do i still use the glitter+mod-podge thing i am painting the whole area?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      Another blogger, Lil’ Blue Boo, does a glitter TOMS tutorial, though I have never personally tried it. She adds a little bit of water to the Modge Podge and glitter mixture to make it less stiff, though I’m not sure how much it loosens up the stiffness. I’m curious to see how it turns out, but not adventurous enough to try. If you were donated the pairs of TOMS, I’d definitely give it a go! You have nothing to lose! :) And the pair Lil’ Blue Boo makes is absolutely adorable! Check out her tutorial. :)

      Reply
  17. Jeana |

    What do you use for the finer detail, outlining and writing? Do the sharpie paint or paint pens work for that?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I use a very fine brush and the same paint I use for the rest of the shoe. I know some other artists use Sharpies. I’ve always been too afraid of them bleeding so I’ve never tried. I mean worst case scenario you can paint over the boo-boo, but I am used to paint and a fine brush so that’s what I use :)

      Reply
  18. Tony |

    Hi Brooke, thanks for the great info that you provided on this post. I wanted to customize some Toms for my wife’s birthday and this was a lifesaver. I haven’t yet gotten to the sealing phase so I hope the artwork holds up to the sealer. If you want to check it out please visit the page that I setup for the project http://drkhrse.tumblr.com/tagged/project-lous . I don’t want to put up the finished product until after her birthday on 11/21, but I’ll keep the page updated. Thanks again!

    Reply
  19. Bobby-Lee |

    Okay, I’m not entirely clear or maybe I didn’t read right but do you paint the sealer all over the shoe or just the design? I really want to try this and I’m very excited but I want to do it right :)

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      Yes, only paint sealer over the design :) Painting it over the shoe won’t cause any damage, but will make the shoes pretty stiff until you break them in, and on lighter colors (like grey and beige) it turns the canvas a darker shade.

      Reply
  20. Rosanna |

    i have a Jo-ann’s Fabric near me and i was wondering if you knew the good brands for sealers. They could have different ones than Dick Blicks.

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      My local Joanns does carry the Liquitex brand, though it is more expensive at Joanns than Blicks. If cost is a concern, Joanns makes their own “generic” brand that lasts fairly long and it’s usually right next to the Joanns acrylic paint :) i would recommend resealing them every few months though if you choose the Joanns sealer

      Reply
  21. Rosanna |

    about how much money do you think a reasonable price for these shoes would be? i dont want to bu something too expencive but im worried if i make it myself, i will mess it up.

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      If you’re commissioning an artist to paint them for you, it depends on how detailed the design is and whether they painted Toms or Bobs. The initial cost of the shoes range from $30 to $55 before the artist actually puts their time and energy into the painting. I have charged between $65 – $90 for painted Bobs in the past with more intricate designs taking me over 10 hours to paint. I’ve seen artists charging upwards of $200 on Etsy which is just rediculous to me, but I only did it as a hobby, not as a career. I guess I really don’t know how to answer this question. But i do know the cost should depend on the complexity of your design. If an artist tries to charge an insane amount for something very simple, RUN!

      Reply
  22. Carolina |

    Hi, i was just wondering, since your design didn’t cover the whole shoe, when you finished it off with a sealer, did you paint the whole shoe, or just the part that you painted on? Thanks!

    Reply
  23. Carolina |

    Nevermind, lol i just saw someone asked the same question as me.. But thanks for making this great tutorial!

    Reply
  24. Betsy |

    I didn’t see this question asked yet. Have you ever painted OVER the Glitter Tom’s shoes? My daughter has a pair of black ones that she wore only a few times….the glitter is about half gone, and they look horrible. She is wanting me to just paint them solid red. I am concerned that as she walks, due to glitter under paint, the new red paint might crack (even if sealed.) Any thoughts?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I have not painted over the Glitter Toms yet. I’ve always been afraid that the paint wouldn’t adhere as well to the glitter spots because they’re a smoother texture that the canvas Classics. Even with the Classics, over extended periods of time, the paint does wear away (I’ve had mine for two years now and just had to repaint the area where the toes bend)… I would imagine the glitter ones would crack even faster because of their texture, though I honestly don’t know, since I’ve always avoided the Glitters… I have recently seen some tutorials for fabric covered Toms, maybe that would be a good solution?
      This blogger provides a pattern for the different parts of the shoe, and this blogger provides a more thorough tutorial.

      I hope this helps!

      Reply
  25. Madison |

    I have a question about the sealer. I can’t seem to find the liquid polymer that you mention. Is it the same as modge podge (or like it)? That and sever other name brands of basically the same thing are all I can find that come up under “Sealer”. Any insight?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      Modge Podge is a lot thicker than an acrylic sealer and doesn’t offer the same UV/UVB protection from the sun. It also dries a little stiffer than sealer. It can still be used though if you aren’t concerned about sun fading and you’re happy with the richness if your colors.

      The sealer I use isn’t the only option. There are numerous acrylic sealers that work equally as good. A long as the label description states it is for archiving acrylic paintings, you should be set :)

      Reply
    • Brooke |

      I have not used that paint before. There are a few stores on Etsy that sell painted Toms and some of them mention using that paint though!

      Reply
  26. Amanda |

    Thanks for all the wonderful tips! I don’t think my question has been asked. But, I recently painted a pair of toms with fabric paint, and I paint on t-shirts… For t-shirts, if I want to use a paint color on a colored t-shirt I first have to paint white and then paint in color. Is this true for colored Toms?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      The same is true for dark colored Tom’s. Typically the white or sand colored shoes can easily be painted over without the white base coat.

      Reply
  27. Elisabeth Laundy |

    Hello! First off, thank you for writing this; It helped so much! Ok, so my question is about the sealer. I’ve heard that Toms don’t do well in the rain. So, my thinking was, if I put the sealer on the whole entire shoe, it would make the shoe waterproof. Do you think that this would work, or would it just be a waste of my time? Again, thank you so much!

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I don’t think sealing the entire shoe would work. Living in California, I haven’t had to deal with rain that much. I don’t think the water will ruin the shoe or the design though.

      Reply
  28. Sooze |

    Thanks Brooke, this is what I’ve been looking for! Making some painted Toms for my daughter in her cheer squad colors, then making some “Cheer Mom” ones for me! Go Twisters! *\O/*

    Reply
  29. Caitlyn |

    Thank you so much for tutorial! I was wondering if I did the whole design in sharpie, would you still recommend sealing the shoes or would the sharpies hold up without it?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I’m not sure. I would test it on a scrap piece of canvas fabric first. The Sharpie may bleed when sealed, but I’ve never tried it. Sorry I can’t be more help!

      Reply
  30. Kristin |

    Thanks for the “how to”! I just finished painting my first pair–how long do you usually wait before sealing your Toms?

    Reply
    • Brooke |

      I usually wait a few hours (3 to 5) before sealing. As long as the paint no longer feels cold or damp, you should be fine.

      Reply
  31. Laura C. |

    I spent some time reading the comments, and I just wanted to let everyone know that the best thing I found to remove paint from the base portion is those cleaning/sanitizing wipes like Clorox Disinfectant Wipes…And thank you for all the sealer information, I have been trying to figure it out and this looks and sounds like the best product!! Great Blog!

    Reply

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